Features

These MotoGP bikes really fly!

The MotoGP caravan on its 22 stops and 15 countries (if we take into account the 19 calendar races plus the three pre-season tests) covers a total of 163,223 kilometres, which equates to approximately four times the circumference of the earth. Among these travels, the most expensive in terms of logistics and human movement are those in which the Championship personnel must collect all their gear, loading it up and traversing time zones to reach countries such as Argentina, Japan or Australia.

Four Boeing 747 Cargo transport more than 150 containers wich include all MotoGP bikes. Every team has a freight of 9.500 kilos by plane

During these ‘exotic’ travels, due to the distance of the venues from Europe, the MotoGP World Championship - which is made up of some 3,000 people -  must organise, with the help of a company like DHL, the shipment of all the materials from door to door. When a race ends, every team rushes to put the bikes in boxes and dismantle the garage and hospitality in record time. The trucks must load all the boxes and take them to the airport of origin. There’s no time to lose… just like being on the track! They have only 36 hours to deliver the equipment from one pit lane to the next.

"Once we get to the next circuit, when we enter through the paddock main gates the boxes are organised outside what will be our pit box area", explains SUZUKI ECSTAR’s Team Coordinator, Roberto Brivio. There begins the work of rebuilding the garage and other facilities that will be needed during the Grand Prix, such as the hospitality unit where lunch and dinner are served every day for team members, journalists, and guests.

These MotoGP bikes really fly!

Four Boeing 747 cargo planes transport more than 380 tons of MotoGP goods to the next Grand Prix, spread over 150 containers. "We, as Team SUZUKI ECSTAR, move about 45 crates. Of which 30 travel by airplane and another 15 by boat," says Brivio. Within the 30 sent by air are all the essentials for the next race, especially the 4 Suzuki GSX-RR bikes, the priority tools, computers, panels, televisions, etc... Also the most hazardous products such as oils, lubricants, contact cleaners… Even the biggest piece of MotoGP is sent by plane: the Safety Car.

These MotoGP bikes really fly!

These MotoGP bikes really fly!

These MotoGP bikes really fly!
These MotoGP bikes really fly!
These MotoGP bikes really fly!
These MotoGP bikes really fly!

Every single team in MotoGP has the rights to transport a freight of 9.500 kilograms paid by Dorna, the company who organises the Championship. "If you go beyond the weight limit you as a team have to pay the extra kilos, but the costs increase drastically. That's why we organised in advance to send some containers by ship. We calculate we can save one third of the budget we would expend by plane ", continues Brivio.

"By boat, however, we send fewer technical materials in advance", says the co-ordinator of the SUZUKI ECSTAR Team. By sea, several containers of 40 feet (around 12 meters) are sent. "Inside about 4,500 kilos worth are materials to build the hospitality (tables, chairs, kitchen materials ...). The other half of the container is composed of other non-technical materials used to build the garage; cables, panels, extra tools, boxes with generators, merchandise...", he adds.

In some places, such as Sepang, the offices and facilities are good enough… There we do not need a special hospitality. They have permanent structures that we decorate with our team panels. In other places like Australia, Argentina, Texas ... instead of having a simple tent we prefer to make our own hospitality ", Brivio explains.

The team has two prefabricated hospitalities. "It consists of two 40-foot containers that are equipped with a kitchen and then assembled with an additional store to create the charm atmosphere for the team and guests. Obviously, it is not the same as in Europe but we have everything customised for Suzuki so we are able to build a very recognisable hospitality with the same SUZUKI ECSTAR graphics ". These prefabricated facilities cover some of the same overseas races, as Brivio points out. "The hospitality from Austin is the same as that used in Buriram, Thailand. And that of Argentina is the one we will use in Motegi."

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